Jon Brack is a freelance photojournalist based out of Washington, DC, who specializes in telling humanitarian and environmental stories, often in geographically isolated locations.  His varied experiences have included living a year at the South Pole, documenting earthquake disaster recovery projects in Nepal, and researching Hawaiian Monk Seals in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.  Through his photography, Jon aims to humanize the foreign, fostering a better understanding of the world’s complexity and ultimately revealing the striking similarities between peoples, cultures, and environments. 

For the past six years, Jon’s experience has expanded to include virtual reality (VR) and other immersive 360-degree storytelling platforms.  He has created interactive tours of inside the space shuttles, around the ruins of Chernobyl, in all rooms of Elvis Presley’s Graceland, and on the isolated beaches of Midway Atoll surrounded by endangered species and marine debris.  His 360-degree video documentaries allow viewers to join community health care workers in rural Malawi and boat with dolphins on Pearl and Hermes Atoll.  Enabling virtual access to off-limit and remote locations enhances the way individuals can simultaneously experience and learn about them by feeling as if they are there in person.  These and other VR projects have been part of assignments with National Geographic, NOAA, the Washington Post, and NASA, among others.

Originally from Colorado, Jon graduated from the University of Oregon with a business degree symbolic of a traditional lifestyle that he’s avoided ever sense while traveling to almost 80 counties on all seven continents.

 

 

All images on this website are copyright Jon Brack and may not be used in any capacity without his express permission.

On Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

On Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.